Titan Arum flowering in Kenneth Post Lab greenhouse in 2012

Titan Arum flowering in Kenneth Post Lab greenhouse in 2012

Students visit Titan Arum in 2012.

Greenhouse growers Heather Anthony & Paul Cooper chart growth of Titan Arum Nov. 8.

Greenhouse growers Heather Anthony & Paul Cooper chart growth of Titan Arum Nov. 8.

Professor Adrienne Roeder in her Weill Hall lab

Tom Silva teaching BIOPL 2400 “Green World/Blue Planet”

Welcome to Plant Biology

Without plants, life on earth would cease to exist. Plants shape our environment and provide us with food, medicine, clothing, and shelter. Today we are faced with an unprecedented series of challenges – global climate change, food shortages, rapid loss of biodiversity, and new and evolving diseases are threatening both the health of the planet as well as human health and well-being. Research in the plant sciences is greatly significant in addressing aspects of each of these issues. Through its broad-based and innovative studies of basic plant biology, the Section of Plant Biology at Cornell University is positioned to contribute real and impactful solutions to these problems at local, state, national, and global scales. Learn more

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Cornell's Graduate Studies in Plant Biology are at the cutting edge of basic and translational plant research and offer top-ranked, interdisciplinary Ph.D. training.
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Undergraduate Studies in Plant Biology

Undergraduates who are interested in studying plant biology at Cornell can major in Plant Sciences or in Biology with a Plant Biology Concentration.
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Adrian Powell and Samuel Leiboff win Barbara McClintock Award

Published: 
Feb 1, 2016
Adrian Powell, a graduate researcher in the laboratory of Professor Jeff Doyle and Sam Leiboff, a graduate researcher in the laboratory of Professor Michael Scanlon, both students in the Plant Biology section at Cornell University, received the 2016 Barbara McClintock Award from the directors of graduate studies in the plant sciences graduate fields.

Winners of the award are chosen because they have made significant contributions to plant science through their research and have “the best potential and greatest background merit.”

The award commemorates the Nobel Prize-winning work of Barbara McClintock, who discovered transposable elements—segments of DNA that can move throughout the genome—while working in maize. McClintock began this work at Cornell University in the 1920s, where she completed a masters and doctoral degree in plant genetics. The endowment for the award came from Robert Rabson, who led the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Biosciences Division for many years, enabling much novel plant physiology research.